Saturday, December 03, 2005

Yeah, right.

You gotta be kidding me. "No bad type?" I don't think so. There is definately some seriously bad type out there.
Ok, fine, I will correct myself here. There are typefaces that are definately better than others, and I guess I won't go as far as to offend those fonts that well... suck. But back to my point of "No bad type", I guess it is usually a case of badly misused type. (But really, some typefaces really do suck). Thank God this chapter went over some typographic ettiquite. We couldn't finish the semseter with all the skills and no license to use them. JK.
I guess because this is my last blog I will sum up what I have learned for the semester.
Before you even attempt to look at a typeface, you need a clear understanding of what the type is going to be used for and who is going to be using it. Remeber this, or all designs will eventually fail.
Using too many type face in one peice can be confusing.
Remember that style comes second, and don't forget about your family!!!!!


Peace out.

what?

I dunno. Maybe it was just me, but I'm really not sure that this chapter provided as much information as it promised. I understand that type holds specific purposes and follows different design layouts for different occasions, but I feel like I learned more about the dos and don't of living room furniture than type in this chapter. I guess that some of the information could be perceived as useful, and it was a nice break from all the talk of type, but I really don't think that I learned what I should have there. Oh, well. Maybe next time.

Good designers know how to make it work.

A good designer knows how to use the limited space they are given and maximize it's potential. There are only a few miliseconds in which a graphic designer has to grab a viewer's attention and interest them enough to keep them from adverting thier eyes. That is why good type is so important. The words have to be large and bold enough so that thery are esily read yet still visually interesting. They must also sum up what the advertisement, article, etc. is about in a limited amount of words. A designer without good type is not much use as a desginer at all. It takes some one with a lot of practice and problem solving skills to get something right on the first try.

Becoming politically correct

Okay, so apparnetly type is not supposed to be described as normal, useful, beautiful or delicate as I have mistakenly done in the past. Oops. I'm new, what can I say? Anyway, apparently there is a real connection between family and type. Yeah I know. I couldn't beleive it either, but in hindsight, it does make sense. Let's discuss Helvetica. Helvetica is not just one font. Oh no. It's an entire class. Bold, i'll associate this with Dad, gets your attenttion, and holds a sense of power. Condensed, your dorky little brother, is good to use when you are trying to crame a lot of words onto one page. Italic, or oblique, your mother, is feminine, and can also be very intense. All different stles with differnts purposes, but all recognisably one working calss or family. I know it's carzy. Who would thunk it?

Problem solving first, style second.

This line from the title of the entry really made me stop and think. I have been having trouble in my own design lately and I haven't been able to figure out what was causing my creative block. This sentance in the reading made me realize that I was operating wihtout a concept. I was concentrating the on the fine art aspects of my work instead of deciding what information was most important and should be included in my designs.
While readin a design book a few weeks back, I came across a wuote that I found quite humorous. It read, "practice safe design- use a concept." I guess these are my new words to live by.

Everyday vs. extraoridnary

Can good type becoming boring? I think so. Type that is designed to be read clearly and easily identified is commonplace in documents such as newspapers and legal documentation. We are exposed to type faces like Times and Helvetica everyday. We have become so accustomed to them that they have become somewhat mundayne. We get excited about the typefaces that appear in special documents like wedding invitations and special events signs. The sad thing is that these unique typefaces are often mistakenly viewed as a cut above the rest, but the reality of the matter is that they only serve limited purposed. It is the versitile everyday fonts that should be seen as extroidinary.

Type with Personaliy (looking at type)

Of course we affeccted by type everyday, we just don't always realize it. I love he analogy used in the text that said "No one would use the same shoes to go dancing, run a mile, climb a mountain or walk to the office." Why should we expect that one typeface could work for every occasion? You wouldn't normally wear sneakers at the office, it's just not appropriate.
In order to more closely examine typography, I will further expand on this analogy. When shopping for shoes, there are specification that we consider. We can't just say we are looking for a dress shoe. We need to know whether or not we need a brown or black shoe, a sandal or a pump, a high heel or a flat, etc. The smae holds true when designing a typeface. We need to keep in mind the purpose of the type how it will be used, will it be coupled with a graphic or other type? The questions are endless which is why type designers must be so meticulous and set in the design idea or concept before they begin, while they are working, and even after the work is completed in order to make certain that their goals have been met.

Type with Personaliy (looking at type)

Of course we affeccted by type everyday, we just don't always realize it. I love he analogy used in the text that said "No one would use the same shoes to go dancing, run a mile, climb a mountain or walk to the office." Why should we expect that one typeface could work for every occasion? You wouldn't normally wear sneakers at the office, it's just not appropriate.
In order to more closely examine typography, I will further expand on this analogy. When shopping for shoes, there are specification that we consider. We can't just say we are looking for a dress shoe. We need to know whether or not we need a brown or black shoe, a sandal or a pump, a high heel or a flat, etc. The smae holds true when designing a typeface. We need to keep in mind the purpose of the type how it will be used, will it be coupled with a graphic or other type? The questions are endless which is why type designers must be so meticulous and set in the design idea or concept before they begin, while they are working, and even after the work is completed in order to make certain that their goals have been met.